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 SRCLD Presentation Details 

  Title  
       
    Language variation within the autism spectrum: where it comes from and why it matters  
Author(s)
Courtenay Norbury - University of London

SRCLD Info
SRCLD Year: 2014
Presentation Type: Invited Speaker
Presentation Time: (na)
Abstract
Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are characterised by profound deficits in social interaction and social communication, in addition to a restricted range of interests and behaviours. Both core deficits should present great challenges for language acquisition, yet many children with ASD are able to acquire age-appropriate structural aspects of language and impressive vocabularies. Discovering how children with ASD learn language in the face of social-cognitive differences highlights additional risk factors that further impede language learning for many children with ASD. A multifactorial approach to understanding language variation will be considered, outlining protective factors that may promote language development in some individuals with ASD. In addition, I will argue that factors that likely increase risk for language impairment may be shared with other neurodevelopmental disorders and point to possible avenues for intervention.
Author Biosketch(es)

 

Supported in part by: NIDCD and NICHD, NIH, R13 DC001677, Susan Ellis Weismer, Principal Investigator
University of Wisconsin-Madison - Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders